Medusa’s legacy

Medusa and the gorgon have left an indelible mark on Western mythology; commonly seen today as either a cool monster for creature feature films or as an icon of the power of feminist anger.
In their early depictions, archaic gorgoneions (the head of the gorgon) had locks of curly hair, beards, fang-tusks, bulging eyes, fat protruding tongues and flat noses. They were usually shown to be disembodied, sometimes featuring a halo of snakes. Descriptions of gorgons recount them as being fearsomely ugly, monstrous women with scaly skin; able to petrify their victims with horror.

As history progressed, so did the manner in which gorgons were portrayed. Modern era gorgons became beautified women with snakes for hair, faces contorted with rage. Their depictions often show them looking away from the viewer, unlike the always full-frontal mask of the gorgoneion. Both species of gorgon have adapted to continue life today.

gorgon

The Predator’s shoulder-mounted weapon system enables it to kill with a glance and its countenance is petrifyingly ugly, resembling an archaic gorgon. Ray Harryhausen’s Medusa of the 1981 Clash of the Titans, with her bow and serpent coils in lieu of legs, was the next evolutionary step for the modern, beatified gorgon.

I imagine a gorgon for the digital age would be a powerfully built, muscular woman with a head replaced by a fearsome mask; a cloud of spasming glitches with an angry rictus snarl facing the viewer no matter which direction she stomps purposefully toward, paralyzing them in fear, causing computer systems to revert back into unthinking rocks.

reference: Medusa: Solving the Mystery of the Gorgon, Stephen R Wilk.

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